Ohm Gnome Festival 2017


Welcome to the annual Ohm Gnome Festival! Throughout the day there will be fun, games and offers all over the internet all around the world with Ohmies and Ohm retailers! Check out Ohm Stuff on Facebook for all the details!

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I am happy to be hosting a giveaway! Enter to win this brand new limited edition glass Rainbowed! The winner is randomly selected from all entries.

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The chalange for you is to tell us what Ohm Gnome is called in your language or dialect. Do you have a local gnome or gnome story you would like to share with the Ohm world? Please tell us all about it! We want to learn about gnomes around the world! If english is difficult for you, you can write in your own language. You have until 9am saturday Dutch time, or midnight tonight Seattle time! Thank you for beeing part of Ohmily!

51 thoughts on “Ohm Gnome Festival 2017

  1. My primary language is English so he’s still called Gnome. I’m Canadian, though, so in Canadian he could be called “Gnome, eh?” 🙂 🙂 🙂 I don’t have a specific story about gnomes, but whenever I think of them I think of the movie “Gnomeo and Juliet.” It’s very cute and clever!

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  2. Gnomes are still called Gnomes where I live in the U.K. We have Gnome World in Cornwall where they have gnomes in all sizes and styles.My motto is ‘Gnome is where the heart is’ so where ever you travel with your Gnome it will feel like Home.

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  3. My first lengsuge os spanish, so gnomo it is. I al chilean, and we don’t have gnomes in the new world, however we have some scary creatures that live in Chiloe island. My favorite is imbunche, he lives in the woods and guards the hiding place of a witch. If you look at it you will get lost in the woods forever

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  4. Hmmm…well gnomes are still gnomes but in Cornwall we also have piskies and knockers. Knockers are similar to gnomes but live underground. Tin-miners used to hear the sound of them digging far below them when they were in the mines, far deeper than a human could ever dig. Piskies are similar to fairies but have no wings, if you treat them well (eg leave them a bowl of milk) they will be helpful but they can be dangerous when trifled with

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  5. I’m Australian so gnomes are gnomes here or we say… That’s not a gnome…. THIS is a gnome :p hehe kidding!
    My gnome story is not original… I fell in love with gnomes as a small child watching the cartoon David the gnome….(if you have never watched ” The World of David the Gnome” do your self a favour and do so… it is adorable!!! which is why the name of my Ohm gnome is … David and my Mrs gnome is Lisa. Maybe one day I will grow up 😉 lol

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  6. Hello Trudy, Gnome’s in The Netherlands are called “kabouter” and his first name is mostly “Wouter”! Rien Poortvliet a Dutch artist made wonderfull books about the live’s of the Dutch Kabouters 😉🍄 They’re not seen often, but everybody knows they exist!! Miriam #woodlandshouse

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  7. I’m in the US and they’re just called gnomes. My story is that when my kids were in fifth grade their teacher was obsessed with them and had miniature gnomes all the way to large garden gnomes all over his classroom.

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  8. Hi Trudy, I’m from the U.S. so here he’s just called gnome. There aren’t really any stories about gnomes, except maybe if some families still tells the ones from their original homelands. (I’m of Irish descent, so I grew up with leprechaun stories!) However, gnome statues are very popular garden decorations here !

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  9. In Italia si chiama Gnomo, e quando ero bambina ricordo che guardavo sempre un cartone che raccontava le avventure degli gnomi e si chiamava “David Gnomo amico mio”!

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  10. In Italy Gnome is called Gnomo.
    There is a place in the region I live called “Sentiero degli Gnomi”, a path crossing a woodland inhabited by gnomes.

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  11. Gnomes in Dutch are called “kabouters”. When I was a little girl my grandparents always took me for long walks in the forrest. My granddad told me to be very quiet so we could see some gnomes. To remember my granddad I bought the Ohm Gnome bead. When I look at my gnome I’m back in that forrest with my grandparents again. So much happy memories.

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  12. I live in American and a gnome is a gnome. Generally, gnomes hide in the gardens and hopefully do some of the weeding. Sorry, but we don’t really have any gnome stories.

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  13. I am American, so we of course say “gnome.” 🙂 I have multiple gnomes in my garden… At night I am quite sure they come to life and get into all kinds of mischief, especially when the faeries come to visit 😉

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  14. They are called Gnomes in the UK., but I like the name Gnomey. A neighbour of mine collects them and they have them all over their garden in different shapes and sizes like a gnome sanctuary.

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  15. I am from Québec, in Canada. Here, we speak french and we call them “gnome” of maybe “lutin”…they live in gardens and are kind of boy faeries without wing…but much older!

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  16. In Danish it’s Nisse. I have a few in my garden and always put out my Christmas ones and change where they are every now and then. Keeps everyone on their toes , after all ” I didn’t move them”! LOL In some book versions of Hans Christian Anderson’s fairy tales Nisse was changed to goblin. Great way of scaring a kid. I’m glad I have the older book that has the right way of using Nisse.

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  17. My native language is Russian and in our fairy tales little magical creatures are called brownies, kikimors and forest spirits.

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  18. Well, I guess that we’d call them “lutin” or “farfadet” (not used as much) in France.
    Actually, we have a little game when my daughter is taking too long to eat diner. We look away from her plate and when we look back, she says she did not eat anything, it was a “petit lutin” who came and stole her food. Strangely enough, the “petit lutin” eats a lot faster than she does…

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  19. Called Gnome where I am from in US.
    Other than garden gnomes, my knowledge is about OhmGnome and Mighty Bear who are fast friends!!!!!! They join me everywhere I go!!!! The best partners in travel, they are! 👜🚢💚

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  20. In Canada we call them gnomes in English and French. Gnomes have a special language they try to teach us so I thought I would share what I know. Gnomes are loved in our Canadian gardens. They are everywhere and we love them!! Especially when there is a rainbow in the sky. That is the best time for gnomes as they know rainbows are miracles and because it is Pride month. Happy pride to the gnomes and all. 🌈🌈

    Gnome-English Translation

    -A-

    arpos: rocks

    ando: gate

    andra: city

    ataris: cow

    -C-

    cef: threat

    cheray: lazy

    Cinquo: King

    cretor: bucket

    -E-

    eis: me

    es: a

    et: and

    eto: will

    -G-

    gandius: jungle

    gal: all

    gentis: leaf

    gutus: banana

    gomondo: branch

    -H-

    har: old

    harij: harpoon

    hewo: grass

    -I-

    ip: you

    imindus: quest

    irno: translate

    -K-

    kar: no

    kai: boat

    ko: sail

    -L-

    lauf: eye

    laquinay: common sense

    lemanto: man

    lemantolly: stupid man

    lovos: gave

    -M-

    meso: came

    meriz: kill

    mina: time(s)

    mos: coin

    mi: I

    mond: seal

    -O-

    o: for

    -P-

    por: long

    prit: with

    priw: tree

    pro: to

    -Q-

    qui: guard

    quir: guardian

    -R-

    rentos: agility

    -S-

    sarko: begone

    sind: big

    -T-

    ta: the

    tuzo: open

    -U-

    undri: lands

    umesco: Soul

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  21. My step-dad grew up in Africa, growing up he would tell me about African myth/folklore. In West Africa, they have a benevolent, small, hairy humanoid that lives in anthills called Azizi. The Azizi give good magic and hunting advice to those who listen. They also smoke long pipes like a more traditional European gnome.
    I always thought they sounded adorable and helpful, just like the Ohm Gnomes and their friends.
    I also have a slight obsession with garden gnomes and have 6 of them hidden in various places as you walk to my door (they’re clever at hiding so they don’t get stolen). I can’t wait to get Aunt Gnome for my bracelet. I’m new to the European bead scene and she’s adorable, and I hear she loves rainbows. 🌈 💓

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  22. In France, we call it also gnome. But depending on the region, he can take different names.
    In Brittany region in the West side of France, there is the “Korrigan”. In the Breton folklore, it is a fairy or dwarf-like spirit. The word korrigan means “small-dwarf”, and it is closely related to the Cornish word “Korrik” which means gnome.
    Benevolent or malicious as the case may be, the Korrigan can be extremely generous, or capable of horrible vengeance.

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  23. I’m English, so he is just gnome. I named him, zohmi gnomie! I have several garden and house gnomes. I also have fae friends who like to tease the gnomes. But we have a lot of fun!

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  24. In flemish we call a gnome “een kabouter”, in my regional dialect that becomes “een kabooterken” (especially when very tiny or super cute) or “ne kabooter”.

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  25. on legends gnomes lived in Russia (live?) in the Urals and in Siberia!) They in mountains dig caves and extract ore, gemstones!)) And from people they hide!)))

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  26. I’m American, so it’s still Gnome! 💜 I love the gnome! I have one hidden in one of my flower beds. Then I move him occasionally just to mess with my family. I tell them he moves on his own! 💜

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  27. I love reading all of these comments! My native language is English and thus it’s “Gnome” for me. Although we could argue it’s “GnOHMe” thanks to the fest creators 😉

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  28. In Spain we call him Nomo 🙂 and I don’t know any story on my country, but when I was a child it was a cartoon series about David el Nomo, it was fun!

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  29. “Gnome” for me in the USA. Whimsical garden gnome figures are often seen in yards and on porches here. Did you know however that except for the year 2013, they are banned from displays at the Chelsea Flower Show in England as too tacky, “gnomes detract from the presentation of the plants or products on display, and from the general appearance of the show”. LOL!!

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  30. Well I’m from the US, so it’s ‘gnome’ for me. However, I currently live in Quebec, so in French they say ‘nain’. You don’t see them too often where I live, but they sure are cute!

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  31. Gnome in Russia called Domovoy. This little gray-haired old man, who lives behind the stove, friendly with cats and loves milk. People believe that as long as Domovoy lives in a house, they are not afraid of any trouble, so they try to feed and care for him.

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  32. Gnome in Canada is just a plain ol’ gnome! At chapters( bookstore) you use to be able to buy a mini gnome and he had a mini passport that went along with him. He was great to take on trips, you could just take the best pictures of him everywhere you go!

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  33. Originally from England and now living in the US, and Gnomes are the same to both 🙂 My favorite reference to Gnomes is from the British movie The Full Monty. One of the men collects garden gnomes and there’s a few hilarious scenes about Gnomes. Well worth a watch 😉 https://youtu.be/a7W8pv9m_sI

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  34. In my town when I was in college people couldn’t keep garden gnomes because a group of young teenagers would steal them. I remember it went on all summer all over the city. This was like 1990. There was a news story about it. People pointing to blank places in their landscaping and gardens to the reporter where their beloved gnome used to be. If I remember correctly the cheeky thieves sometimes left ransom notes or good bye letters. Near the end of the summer the culprits were caught because they were also stealing bikes. All the gnomes were found in a backyard shed along with the bikes. It was a funny kitschy story while it was happening.

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  35. I come from Poland and we call all gnomes Krasnale (one gnome is KRASNAL). There is no famous gnome in the city I come from but let me tell you a story about the place I used to lived/studied. The name of city is Wrocław/Breslau and it is actually called the City of Gnomes (Miasto Krasnali). All over the city there is a lot of figurines/statuettes of gnomes in every action (walking, standing, on the bike, drinking beer and many many more). They are quite small so you have to look for them.. City has even the map with places where you can find them. It’s such a fun to find all of them and so far they have 165 gnomes and every year or special event they create the new one. Cannot add photos here so here is a website link for anyone interested
    http://krasnale.pl/en/ . And one more thing.. was thinking if I need/want OHM gnome charm and now I know I need him;) cause loved my previous place of living and Wrocławskie KRASNALE. Thank you and sorry for any mistakes (english is not my mother language). Regards

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  36. Well I am from Germany so he is called Gartenzwerg of course. They were quite popular and almost every garden had one, then tehy were unpopular again but they have become popular again of course. Sometimes I send a Gartenzwerg to my friends abroad for fun!

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  37. I’m in the US, so he’s still a gnome to me. Such a cute little guy, I really wish I saw more of them in gardens and such but I guess he’s kind of endangered where I live in Florida. Maybe we should start a captive breeding program…

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  38. Here in the US he is simply called gnome or sometimes garden gnome. I had brought a wonderful little gathering of gnomes to my garden in my front yard, but as gnomes love to do, they eventually left on their own to travel the world. Every once in a while I run into one of my buddies out on an adventure.

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  39. The word “gnome” in Russian sounds as “gnom” (гном) which is very close to tbe English version :))

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